Saturday, December 12, 2009

From India: Andhra Pradesh, civil war in our state (Teams visiting here in February)

Greetings,

News from AP state in India, where we have four ministries we work with: Pastor Samuel, with OSJ, John Ebenezer, with MFM and CMM, and Jai Malipudi, CMM,  and one other. Pray for AP state.

2-3 teams from Vision for Israel, MorningStar, and CMM will be visiting AP in February from Charlotte, Wilkesboro, NC area and Maine.

First, see an article from the web about proposed split of AP state into two states. Second, is an email from Jai Mallipudi, a CMM missionary.  Jai's wife, Yori, went to school at Wade Taylor's.

Decision to create new Indian state sparks protest

NEW DELHI — Protesters took to the streets Friday, setting public buses on fire and clashing with police, in anger over India's decision to carve a new state out of the southern region of Andhra Pradesh.

The conflict highlighted the tensions that underlie the vast array of ethnic and linguistic groups bound together in the massive Indian nation.

The country has allayed some of that friction by giving substantial power to its 28 states and creating new states to empower still more ethnic minorities.

In a surprise move, the federal government agreed Wednesday to give in to a 11-day hunger strike by a senior politician, K. Chandrasekhara Rao, who demanded the creation of the new state of Telangana out of the vast state of Andhra Pradesh.

As Rao's condition weakened, his supporters stepped up protests and threatened to storm the state legislature.

Telangana supporters have complained their area in the north of the state was underdeveloped and ignored by powerful politicians from southern Andhra Pradesh. Demands for a separate state have erupted sporadically since the 1950s.

The government's decision to create a new state led to counter protests. A mob rampaged through the streets of Hyderabad, the capital of Andhra Pradesh, Friday in anger over the government's decision. Under the proposal, Hyderabad would be located deep inside Telangana, though it was not clear whether it would be part of the new state, the old state, or serve as a joint capital.

The crowd lit a bus ablaze and threw rocks at vehicles, while police tried to disperse them with batons.

The decision also stirred anger within the ruling Congress Party, with more than 130 Andhra Pradesh legislators resigning from the party to oppose the division of one of India's largest states.

Already, the government appeared to be backtracking. Andhra Pradesh chief minister K. Rosaiah said the government would move ahead with the decision only if a broad consensus was evident among the people of the state.

The government's initial decision has given hope to ethnic minority groups across India who have been pushing for states of their own for decades, including in the remote northeast, where long simmering separatist demands often boil over into violence.

"If Andhra Pradesh can be divided to create a new state, why not Assam? Our demand for a separate Bodoland state for the Bodo ethnic group is more than two decades old," Hagrama Mohilary, chief of the autonomous Bodoland Territorial Council, said Friday.

Meanwhile, critics said the government did not properly study the ramifications before announcing its decision on Telangana.

"The decision was taken in immense haste. It wasn't thought through. The party's own legislators are rebelling against this," said Pratap Bhanu Mehta, political analyst and head of the Center for Policy Research in New Delhi.

He said activists' demands that large states be divided along ethnic lines to empower the minority groups has merit.

"India has four times the population of the United States, but far fewer states. A demand for smaller more representative states is justified, but this needs to be done within a constitutional framework and not by giving in to political agitations of this kind," Mehta said.

There are also movements calling for the break up of at least six other states besides Andhra Pradesh.

On Friday, leaders of the Gorkhas — a group of ethnic Nepalis living in West Bengal — called for an indefinite strike to push their decades-old demand for the creation of Gorkhaland.

Associated Press writer Wasbir Hussain contributed to this report from Gauhati.




Dr.Jorge and sister Anna Maria,

    We are so happy to inform you that we had a spirit-filled prayer meet with all our believers in last night.We all could intercede for you,especially for your trip to India.

   God is good at all times. Amen!

   But enemy has been working so much for past few days in our state of Andhra Pradesh, even to whole country. We have been going through the problem of CIVIL WAR within the state. Many young people are being killed in the reginal disputes and many public and private properties are being destroyed and ruined and set on fire.
   As a result, for past two days we  have been having strike in our state. No public transporation to travell around now. Private vehicle are allowed now. This strike today and tomorrow. Since, we don't have any vehicle, we are facing a big challenge and bitter experience today to go around in order to prepare for our forth-coming outreach on 15th of December.
    PLEASE DO PRAY FOR PEACE IN OUR STATE NOW. And also please do pray for our transporation/our old van to be fixed for the mission.  
 
   We are very much challenged.
  BUT WE TRUST IN JESUS. HE WILL DO A MIRACLE. AMEN!
    JESUS IS THE SAME YESTURDA,TODAY AND FOREVER. AMEN.
   Please continue to pray and stand with us as the Lord leads you.
   Tomorrow by evening, we have to buy blankets,food stuff, pitch tents and so on. We are very much challenged now financially and with the civil war and transporation.
   BUT WE PRAY THAT NONE OF THESE OBSTACLES WILL STOP US TO REACH THESE LOST SOULS. AMEN!
           THANKS A LOT FOR STANDING WITH US AT THE TIME SUCH AS THIS.
          LOOKING FORWARD TO HEAR FROM YOU AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.
                          IN HIS SERVICE,
                        YOUR BROTHER&SISTER IN CHRIST,
                             JAI&YORI.